European University of Tirana

 

Bulgarian Academy of Science

 

Peacebuilding UK

 

Ivanovo Center for Gender Studies

 

5th International Summer School 

 

 

"Overcoming Trauma of War in Post-conflict Societies through Gender Lenses"

  

11-24 July 2016

Durres, Albania

DETAILED PLAN

 

DAY ONE

Date: MONDAY 11 July 2016

Dr. Stef Jansen

Morning Session

Time: 9.30 - 10.00

 

Opening ceremony, introducing of participants

 

Block 1: (RE)MAKING HOME IN THE BALKANS: A GENDERED PERSPECTIVE

 

 

Session 1

Time: 10.00 - 11.30

 

Topic: Unmaking home

 

Format: Lecture + Film

 

Lecturer: Stef Jansen

 

Objectives: What does it mean to say that the post-Yugoslav wars were not relapses into pre-modernity but rather 'very modern wars'? How did campaigns to imprint forms of national classification in 'homelands' become the basis for legitimising violence? Which tensions between ascribed 'national identities' and subjectively felt 'national identities' arise? Why is it important to take into account the relative salience of national difference amongst other classifications? And why is it important to take into account the relative intensity of someone's sense of national belonging?

 

Assignments: Reading core text C Sorabji (see syllabus)

Coffee Break

11.30-12.00

Session 2

Time: 12.00-13.30

 

Topic: Home and place: return to what?

 

Format: Lecture + Film + Discussion

 

Lecturer: Stef Jansen

 

Objectives: What does it mean to return to your 'home of origin'? Is your 'house' the same as your 'home'? What is the role of practices and relationships in people's sense of belonging to particular places? If return is best understood as part of processes of transformation, how can a focus on home-making help us understand this? When studying people's sense of belonging to particular places, why should we take into account both movement and non-movement? What are the implications of such understandings for policies promoting the return of refugees and internally displaced persons after violence?

 

Assignments: Reading core text S Jansen + case study A (see syllabus)

Lunch

13.00 -14.00

Afternoon Session

 

Session 3

Time: 14.00 – 15.30

 

Topic: Home and community: return to whom?

 

Format: Lecture + Film + Discussion

 

Lecturer: Stef Jansen

 

Objectives: Policies on the return of refugees and internally displaced persons focus on the restitution of property and on physical safety. But what about the social dimension of return? How does the new composition of the population inform people's decisions on return and their experiences of it, if they do return? How can a focus on home-making help us understand this? And what is the role of gender and stage in the life course in this?

 

Assignments: Reading core text T Kolind + case study B (see syllabus)

Social dinner

20.30-23.00

 

DAY TWO

Date: TUESDAY 12 July 2016

Dr Stef Jansen

Morning Session

 

Session 4

Time: 9.30-11.00

 

Topic: Home and reconciliation: whose peace?

 

Format: Lecture + Film

 

Lecturer: Stef Jansen

 

Objectives: In recent decades much attention in post-conflict situations is paid to processes of reconciliation. But how are the sides to be reconciled defined? What does reconciliation actually mean in practice? Whose reconciliation is being promoted, by whom, and what for? How much is reconciliation a priority and for whom? In which ways, if at all, do women and men integrate reconciliation into their everyday concerns?

 

Assignments: Reading core text S Jansen (see syllabus)

 

 

Coffee Break

Time: 11.00 - 11.30

 

 

Session 5

Time: 11.30-13.00

 

Topic: Home and intervention: whose democracy?

 

Format: Lecture + Film + Discussion

 

Lecturer: Stef Jansen

 

Objectives: How do political interventions on different scales interact in 'supervised states'? What is the role of other states, of supra-state institutions (e.g. the EU), of the so-called 'International Community', of NGOs…? How do local people deal with this? How is this related to balkanist representations of the post-Yugoslav region as 'behind', as 'immature'? How do foreign interventions play out in different ways for different people, e.g. along gendered or age lines?

 

Assignments: Reading core text K Coles + case study C (see syllabus)

 

 

Lunch

13.00 -14.00

 

 

Afternoon Session

 

Session 6

Time: 14.00 - 15.30

 

Topic: Home and politics: 'normal lives'

 

Format: Lecture + Film

 

Lecturer: Stef Jansen

 

Objectives: Whenever the Balkans are in the news abroad, it tends to be because of certain political issues. What is the most common attitude towards politika in the region? How do people try to present their lives as entirely separate from politika? Why? Does this means people prefer individualist alternatives, trying to avoid order and evade control? What is the role of 'the state' in their understandings? Which socially acceptable roles are available for women and for men when they do engage in something that others may see as politics?

 

Assignments: Reading core text E Helms (see syllabus)

 

 

 

 

DAY Three

date: Wednesday 13th July 2016

Dr Ingrid Sharp

Morning Session

time: 9.30 – 11.00

 

Topic: From shellshock to PTSD: dealing with wartime trauma

 

Format: Lecture

 

Instructor: Dr Ingrid Sharp

Coffee Break

Time: 11.00 – 11.30

Lecture 2

Time 11.30-13.00

 

topic(s): Discussion of John Huston’s 1946 film ‘Let there be Light’

 

instructor(s) Ingrid Sharp

 

format: Discussion

 

assignments: Watch the film, available on YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uiD6bnqpJDE

Gary Egerton (1987) ‘Revisiting the recordings of Wars Past. Remembering the documentary trilogy of John Huston’ Journal of popular film and Television Spring 1987: 15, 1: 27-41 

Reviews of the film in American newspapers

Lunch

13.00 -14.00

Afternoon Session

time:14.00 – 15.30

 

topic(s):Trauma  and masculinities in different cultural contexts

 

format: summary and discussion of the article

Catherine Merridale  2000 ‘The collective mind: Trauma and Shellshock in Twentieth Century Russia’ Journal of Contemporary History, Vol 35 No 1, Special Issue: Shellshock (Jan 2000), pp. 39-55.

A personal story of a man with PTSD in America after the Vietnam War

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qYtXlVfv4Kc

World War 1 War neurosis and shellshock treatment  (Britain)

https://youtu.be/IWHbF5jGJY0

 

Assignments: watch the videos and consider the following questions:

How is the story framed?

What aspects of masculinity are retained by the traumatized man?

How does he overcome his trauma?

What message does the story have for viewers of the news item?

How do the two videos differ in their presentation of war trauma?

Read the article and/or reflect on the questions

  1. Is there a cultural difference in attitudes to men who suffer mental breakdown as a result of trauma?
  2. How have attitudes to trauma changed since WW1?
  3. What in your view is the cause of trauma in men and how can it best be prevented and/or treated?

 

 

 

DAY FOUR

date: Thursday 14th July 2016

Dr Ingrid Sharp

Morning Session

time: 9.30 – 11.00

 

Topic: Unspeakable horror? Remembering the air raids in Germany 1939-45

How can nations and individuals express and remember horrific historical events?

 

Format: Lecture

 

Instructor: Dr Ingrid Sharp

Coffee Break

Time: 11.00 – 11.30

Lecture 2

Time 11.30-13.00

 

topic(s): Discussion of Kurt Vonnegut’s 1969 novel Slaughterhouse 5

 

instructor(s) Ingrid Sharp

 

format: Discussion

 

assignments: Read the novel and the articles

Amanda Wicks (2014) “All This Happened, More or Less”: The Science

Fiction of Trauma in Slaughterhouse-Five, Critique: Studies in Contemporary Fiction, 55:3, 329-340.

Donald J Greiner (1973) ‘Vonnegut's Slaughterhouse Five and the Fiction of Atrocity’ Critique; Jan 1, 1973; 14, 3; Periodicals Archive Online pg. 38-51.

Lunch

13.00 -14.00

Afternoon Session

time:14.00 – 15.30

 

topic(s):Aerial bombing of German cities in WW2: war crime or military strategy?

 

format:

Discussion: The German and British debate: W. G. Sebald’s  On The Natural History of Destruction (1999) and ‘Bomber’ Harris and the bombing of Dresden 1945.

 

Assignments: read the novel, watch the videos and consider the following questions:

The German debate: W.G. Sebald and Jörg Friedrich

What does Sebald argue about the representation of aerial bombing in Germany?

How does he represent the bombing?

How does this compare with Vonnegut’s in Slaughterhouse 5?

What does he say about the German reaction to the bombing?

What place does the bombing have in German and British cultural memory?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tqukS2ClMs0

The British debate: Bomber Harris and the bombing of German cities: War Crime or military strategy?

What are the arguments for and against bombing of civilians in cities during wars?

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2276944/I-destroyed-Dresden-Bomber-Harris-unrepentant-German-city-raids-30-years-end-World-War-Two.html

Bomber Harris interview (7 minutes) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OCmWoqIbA04

Summarise the arguments and justification for and against the area bombing of Germany during WW2.

 

 

 

DAY FIVE

date: Friday , July 15

Dr Trudy Anderson

Morning Session

time: 9.30 – 11.00

 

Time: 10.00 – 11.00

 

Topic: The War in Albania and Women: the 1997 “Civil War”, the Post-Soviet Syndrome, The Mafia,  and Gender; The “War” Over Minds and Bodies

 

Format: Lecture, handouts on Post-Communist and Post-Soviet Syndrome

(handout taken from : Martina Kicperova-Baker's work on “The Post-Communist Syndrome, Open Society, 1999.)

In Albania, Under Soviet and Chinese influences, and those of the Totaliatarian Dictatorship:

Manifestations of Post- Soviet Syndrome in the Gendered lens of Identity, Emotions, Cognitions, Actions and Morals in the arenas of the individual, the inter-personal,

the community, the social/and economic, the State, the International, and the worldview

(weltanschauung). A comparison with other Post- Soviet and Post-Communist countries:

China, Cuba, Russia.

 

Readings:

1. The Post -Soviet Syndrome, Collective Dis-Memory, Collective Amnesia, and “The Hidden Documentary” in Albania. Trudy Anderson, Fabian Kati, Ilda Papajani, IDMC, 2015.

2.  “Krushchev and Stalin's Ghost: Background and Meaning of Krushchev's Secret Report to the Twentieth Congress Night of February 24-25, 1956”, Federick A. Praeger, New YorK :1957.

 

 

Instructor: Dr. Trudy Anderson

Coffee Break

Time: 11.00 – 11.30

Lecture 2

Time 11.30-13.00

 

topic(s): The 1971 “aperture” and the following tightening of all

all  control, including media. “The Hidden Documentary”: A Historical Case Study.

 

instructor(s)

 

format: Round Table Discussion, film  

 

assignments: Gender and Historical Trauma in Society-- Albania, a Case Study, Part I

 

Lunch

13.00 -14.00

Afternoon Session

time:14.00 – 15.30

 

topic(s):Media censorship and gender and race

 

Format: Problems/ Solutions Session- The Albanian “Case Study”

 

assignments: What are other mechanisms besides the law, for creating change?

 

Assignments: Answer the question: What we can do in order to facilitate the promotion of anti discrimination laws and mechanisms on local and regional levels?

 

Evening session

20.30-22.15

Topic “Bodies of War” Screening the film “Body of War” with following discussion

 

 

DAY SIX

WEEKEND

date: Saturday  July 16  Trip to Tirana

 

 

DAY SEVEN

WEEKEND

date: Sunday , July 17 Ancient Albania: Trip to Apollonia

 

 

 

DAY EIGHT

date: Monday , July 18

Dr Trudy Anderson

Morning Session

time: 9.30 – 11.00

 

Topic: The Gender Lens and Conflict

 

Format: Lecture

Gendered Approach to Others in Decision Making, Self-Sufficiency, Problem Situations and the Outcome of Success Patterns, from Assertive to Aggressive Gendered Behaviour in Historical and Cross-Cultural Analysis: Soviet, Post- Soviet, Albania in “Transition”.

Readings:

1.“Why Stalinist Musicals”,  Trudy Anderson, DISCOURSE, 17.3, pp. 38-48.

2. “Gender, State and Society inSoviet and Post-Soviet Russia”, ed. Sarah Ashwin. Rouledge, London: 2000.

3. “The Assertive Woman”, Stanlee Phelps and Nancy Austin. San Luis Obispo, CA. Impact, 1975, p. 11: and Gerald Piaget, American Orthopsychiatric Association, 1975.

 

Instructor: Dr. Trudy Anderson

Coffee Break

Time: 11.00 – 11.30

Lecture 2

Time 11.30-13.00

 

topic(s): Socialist Realism and Gender, Post- Soviet Syndrome, Canun and Besa

 

instructor(s)

 

format: Round Table, film clips

 

assignments: Gender and Historical Trauma in Society-- Albania, a Case Study, Part II; Current Albania

 

Lunch

13.00 -14.00

Afternoon Session

time:14.00 – 15.30

 

topic(s):A Gendered Conflict Response Analysis

 

Format: Problems/ Solutions Session- The Albanian “Case Study”

 

assignments: Gender and conflict: Historical and Gendered ways of dealing with conflict. Influences: race, socialism, the canun system, the mafia and cartel, and the current “transition”.

 

Assignments: Chart- a “cultural” gendered self analysis

 

 

 

 

 

 

DAY NINE

Date: Tuesday 19 July 2016

Dr. Nikolai Vukov Refugee waves, traumatic events, and collective memory

 

Morning Session

Time: 9.30 - 10.00

Session 1

Time: 9.00-10.30

 

Topic: Introduction to the main themes covered by the course. Historical perspectives on collective memory of forceful migration. Presentation: “Refugee waves and population resettlements during the Balkan wars and World War II in the Balkans – the case of Bulgaria”

 

Format: Lecture

 

Lecturer: Nikolai Vukov

Coffee Break

11.30-12.00

Session 2

Time: 12.00-13.30

 

Topic: Presentation: “Traumatic events, memory transmission and representation – the case of ‘Thracian refugees’ in Bulgaria”

 

Format: Presentation

 

Lecturer: Nikolai Vukov

 

Objectives:

 

Assignments:

Lunch

13.00 -14.00

Afternoon Session

 

Session 3

Time: 14.00 – 15.30

 

Topic: Discussion – Studying war conflicts and population displacements from the perspectives of war, refugee and memory studies

 

Format: Discussion

Suggested readings:

Castles, Stephen, Mark J. Miller, The Age of Migration. International Population Movements in the Modern World. The Guilford Press: New York, 1993 (excerpts)

Rieber, A., “Repressive Population Transfers in Central, Eastern and South-eastern Europe: A Historical Overview”, in: Rieber, A., ed., Forced Migration in Central and Eastern Europe. Frank Cass: London, Portland, 2000

Ther, Philipp, Ana Siljak, eds., Redrawing Nations. Ethnic Cleansing in East-Central Europe, 1944-1948. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers: Lanham, Boulder, New York, Oxford, 2001.

 

Lecturer: Nikolai Vukov

 

Objectives:

 

Assignments: Text: Benmayor, Rina, Andor Skotnes, “Some Reflections of Migration and Identity”, in: Benmayor, R., A. Skotnes, eds., Migration and Identity. Transaction Publishers: New Brunswick and London, 2005.

Questions:

  • How do war conflicts and population displacements influence the practices of memory and commemoration?
  • What are the main aspects outlining memory of forceful resettlements as specific forms of collective remembrance?

How is memory of forceful resettlements maintained and reproduced over time?

 

 

 

 

DAY TEN

Date: Wednesday 20 July 2016

Dr. Nikolai Vukov  War conflicts, population displacements and cultural heritage

Morning Session

Time: 9.30 - 11.00

Session 1

Time: 9.30 - 11.00

 

Topic: Interactive lecture: “War conflicts, population displacements and cultural heritage: international policies and instruments related to heritage preservation”

 

Format: Interactive lecture

 

Lecturer: Nikolai Vukov

Coffee Break

11.00-11.30

Session 2

Time: 11.30-13.00

 

Topic: Presentation: “Trans-border commemorations and cultural heritage – examples from the Bulgarian- Turkish border”

 

Format: Presentation:

 

Lecturer: Nikolai Vukov

Lunch

13.00 -14.00

Afternoon Session

 

Session 3

Time: 14.00 – 15.30

 

Topic: Discussion – Studying war conflicts and population displacements from the perspectives of border, gender and heritage studies

 

Format: Discussion

Suggested readings:

Adell, Nicolas, Regina F. Bendix, Chiara Bortolotto, Marcus Taushek, eds., Between Imagined Communities and Communities of Practice. Participation, Territory and the Making of Heritage. Unversitätsverlag Göttingen, 2015. (excerpts)Kirshenblatt-Gimblett, Barbara, Destination Culture: Tourism, Museums, and Heritage. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1998.

La Barbera, Maria Catherina, ed., Identity and Migration in Europe: Multidisciplinary Perspectives. Springer, 2015.

Wong, Laura, ed., Globalization and Intangible Cultural Heritage. Paris: UNESCO, 2005.

 

 

Lecturer: Nikolai Vukov

 

Objectives:

 

Assignments: Text: Vukov, Nikolai, Resettlements, Memory and Commemorative Returns: the Noting of the “Revival” Process in Bulgaria and the Politics of Memory. In: M. Elchinova, V. Ganeva-Raycheva, L. Gergova, S. Penkova, N. Rashkova, N. Vukov, M. Zlatkova, Migration, Memory, Heritage: Socio-Cultural Approaches to the Bulgarian-Turkish Border. Sofia, IEFSEM – BAS: 12–28. – http://www.2sidesborder.org/migration%20EN/index.html#/1/

Questions:

  • How is cultural heritage of displaced communities construed after war conflicts and refugee waves?
  • What are the international policies and mechanisms for safeguarding the cultural heritage of displaced communities?
  • How are gender identities reflected in different forms of maintaining cultural heritage and collective identity of displaced communities?

 

Evening session

20.30-22.30

Cinema club “Gendered cinema” Screening the film “Parada” with following discussion

 

 

 

DAY ELEVEN

July 21,  Lecturer – Assoc. Prof. Ana Luleva

Morning Session

09.30-11.00

 

1.     Topic: Debates about “Double Genocide” – EU-policies and national discourses. Part 1.

  

 

Tasks: to present the debate about “the Double Genocide” and his dimensions in the EU-Politics of memory and in the national discourses and memory cultures

 

Lecturer: Ana Luleva

 

Form: Presentation

11.00-11.30

Coffee Break

 

 

2.     Topic: Debates about “Double Genocide” – EU-policies and national discourses. Part 2.  

 

Task:  to discuss the memory politics and memory cultures about WWII in Central and Eastern Europe, Southeastern Europe and Baltic States in comparison

 

Form: Discussion

 

Readings:  Reading: Memory and Theory in Eastern Europe, Ed. by U. Blacker/A. Etkind/J. Fedor. Palgrave, 2013, Part I and II.

 

Lunch

13.00-14.00

 

15.00 – 16.30 Trauma as a topic in the transitional justice and human rights discourses after 1989 in Eastern Europe.  Part 1.

 

 

Task: Trauma is a crucial topic in the discourses about human rights and transitional justice politics after the WWII. The task of the presentation is to give some knowledge and to propose a material for discussion about the connection between memory, trauma, human rights, political and historical justice in posttraumatic societies.  

 

Lecturer: Ana Luleva

 

Form: Presentation

 

 

DAY TWELVE

July 22,  Lecturer –Assoc. Prof. Ana Luleva

Morning Session

09.30-11.00

 

Topic: Trauma as a topic in the transitional justice and human rights discourses after 1989 in Eastern Europe.  Part 2 .

  

 

Tasks: To discuss the relation Trauma-Memory-Transitional Justice in different political and national contexts

 

Lecturer: Ana Luleva

 

Form: Discussion

 

Reading: 1. On Living through Soviet Russia, ed. by D. Bertaux, P. Thompson, A. Rotkirch. Chapters 9 and 10.

2. Memory, War and Trauma by N. Hunt. Chapter 7 and 8.

Coffee break

11.00-11.30

11.00 – 12.30

Topic:  Gender and Memory about terror: two case studies in Bulgaria Part 1.

 

Task: To address the gender specific memory about terror and WWII using the examples of memories of men and women.  

 

Lecturer: Ana Luleva

 

Form: Presentation

Lunch

  13.00-14.00

Afternoon  Session

14.00 - 15.30

 

Topic:  Gender and Memory about terror: two case studies in Bulgaria.

Part 2

 

Task: To discuss the gender specific memory about terror using the examples of narratives of men and women. 

 

Lecturer: Ana Luleva

 

Form:  Discussion

 

Reading: Luleva, A. Politics of Memory in Post-socialist Bulgaria and handouts

 

 

 

Morning Session

09.30-11.00 Round-table

 

Topic: "Overcoming of war trauma in Russia and Europe: gender aspects".

 

 

 

Questions for discussion:

How does the process of building cultural memory of war and overcoming war trauma affect the framing of national history?

- What is the influence of this process on formation of national, cultural and gender identities?

- What are the gender differences in overcoming trauma? How do trauma and commemoration affect building of gender relationships?

- How do refugees and forced migrants influence the recipient societies? What political, social, cultural, demographic changes do they cause?

- Traumas of contemporary world: nowadays challenges and practices of overcoming

 

 

Task: divide in small groups, choose one  question for discussion, discuss it beforehand and present the result of your discussion at the round table

11.00 – 1130

Coffee Break

11.30-12.30

Form: roundtable, part 2

 

Teaching About Rape in War and Genocide.

Overcoming trauma

 

Questions for discussion :

Why teach? How to speak about violence? Who should to be taught?

How to help victims of violence?

 

Format: common discussion, sharing personal experience of working with victims of violence

12.30-13.30

 Closing session

 

DAY FOURTEEN

WEEKEND

date: Sunday , July 24  Excursion to Berat

 

 

 

DAY ONE

date:03 July

 

time: 9.00 – 10.30

Registration, opening ceremony

Break

Time: 10.30-11.00

Morning Session

11.00-12.30

 

topic(s): Intergroup conflict: nature, content, causes.

 

instructor(s) Liudmila Azarova

 

format: Lecture

 

Objective: The issues of the conflict. Intergroup conflicts and their manifestations in the modern world. What are the conflicts relate to intergroup? What are the mechanisms of their origin? Typology and dynamics of intergroup conflicts. Functions of intergroup conflict. Tools, forms, and basic paradigms of resolving intergroup conflicts.

 

Assignments

Lunch

12.30 -13.00

Afternoon Session

13.00 – 14. 30

 

Topic: The process of negotiations. Mediation and facilitation.

 

Format: Lecture

 

Objective: Negotiations as means to achieve mutual voluntary agreement. The basics of negotiation. The concept of mediation. The concept of facilitation. The main stages of formation and development of Institute of mediation: Russian and foreign experience.

Walking tour around Reggio

19.30-20.30

Social Dinner

20.30 -23.00

 

DAY TWO

date:04 July

Morning Session

time: 9.00 – 10.30

 

Topic: Conflictological competence.

 

Format: Рractice

 

Assignments: Read the article «Model Body Knot: a tool for personal development, communication and conflict resolution»

Break

10.30-11.00

Morning Session

11.00-12.30

 

topic(s): Effective mediation

 

instructor(s) Liudmila Azarova

 

format: Lecture

 

Objective: The basic concepts of mediation: the mediator, mediation competence, principles of mediation, the position of the mediator. Comparative analysis: mediation and other methods of conflict resolution. Features of functioning of mediation in conflict resolution. Problems of application of mediation procedures in Russia.

 

assignments:

 

Lunch

12.30 -13.30

Afternoon Session

13. 30 – 15.00

 

Topic: The mediation procedure

 

Format: Lecture

 

Objective: The structure of mediation. The stage of mediation. The stages of mediation. The result of the mediation. 

 

DAY THREE

date:05 July

Morning Session

time: 9.00 – 10.30

 

Topic: The mediation tools

 

Format: Рractice

 

Assignments

Break

10.30-11.00

Morning Session

11.00-12.30

 

topic(s): The argumentative scheme in the discourse of mediation.

 

instructor(s) Liudmila Azarova

 

format: Lecture

 

Objective: Argumentative dialogue as a form of realization of the discourse of mediation. Scheme for the analysis of argumentative dialogue in the discourse of mediation. The counterargument in the social system of mediation.

 

assignments:

 

Lunch

12.30-13.30

Afternoon Session

13.30-15.00

 

Topic: The concept of facilitation.

 

Format: Lecture

 

Objective: Studies of social facilitation. The goal of facilitation. Principles of facilitation. Stages of facilitation. Recommendations to the facilitator. The rules of facilitation. The regulations complete the process of facilitation.

 

 

 

DAY FOUR

date:6 July 2017

Morning Session

time: 9.00 – 10.30

 

topic(s): 'Women within Mobilization for War’

 

instructor(s) Nejra Nuna Čengić, PhD

 

format: lecture and discussion

 

Objective: The aim of the session is to present positioning of women (particularly women associations) towards nationalist mobilization for war. Using case of pre-war situation in former Yugoslavia during ‘90s and two antiwar women associations it will be shown how women openly opposed to war from different reasons: in this case, struggle against patriarchy (war and nationalism) at one side, and at the other side from maternity reasons - opposing their sons to go to war (in general, or even more to fight on the ‘wrong side’).

 

Assignments: Core text: YUVAL-DAVIS, NIRA. 2003. „Nationalist Projects and Gender Relations“. In Nar. umjet. 40/1, pp. 9-36

 

Break

10.30 -11.00

Morning Session

11.00 – 12. 30

 

Topic: 'Women and Men within War: Roles, Positions, Actions’

 

Format: lecture, screening of a film inserts and discussion

 

Objective: The session presents step further in examining impact of nationalistic politics, this time among women and men within general population during wartime. Against dominant portraying of men as only warrior and women as food provider and keeper of the family, it will be shown how this division is more complex and how diverse social roles women and men have during the war and how do they impact their actions. Despite dominant perception of war as only rupture and discontinuity, it will be further shown how practices of antinationalism (mainly in the form of caring and helping) are happening dominantly within framework of continuities of human relationships, either through informal realms such as neighborhood, or through institutional framework through various forms of institutional loyalty.

 

Assignments: same core text as for the previous session

Lunch

Time: 12.30-13.30

Afternoon Session

13.30-15.00

 

Topic: Women in Peace Negotiations

 

Format: simulation of peace negotiation (the material will be submitted in advance for translation)

 

Objective: The aim of the session is to learn more about the conflict as such: demonstrating interests and needs of both sides; to get some sense of negotiations process and to provide framework for final discussion about women in negotiations process.

 

Assignments: Core reading:

Waylen, Georgina. “A Seat at the Table - is it Enough? Gender, Multi-Party Negotiations and Institutional Design in South Africa and Northern Ireland.“ Politics and Gender. Available at: http://www.academia.edu/17091052/A_Seat_at_the_Table_-_is_it_Enough_Gender_Multi-Party_Negotiations_and_Institutional_Design_in_South_Africa_and_Northern_Ireland

  

 

DAY FIVE

date:7 July 2017

Morning Session

time: 9.00 – 10.30

 

topic(s): Whose Peace?

 

instructor(s) Nejra Nuna Čengić, PhD

 

format: lecture (including screening of inserts of film) and discussion

 

Objective: Since most of wars end with some international intervention, it will be shown how international community not only mediates into war ending, but conceptualizes peace with necessary infrastructure for it. Using case of BiH where presence of international community is particularly emphasized, it will be shown how international community functions in an ambivalent way: fostering processes of intergration at one hand and exclusion at the other hand.

 

assignments: Core text: Coles K. 2002. 'Ambivalent builders: Europeanization, the production of difference, and internationals in Bosnia-Herzegovina' Political and Legal Anthropology Review 25:1, 1-18.

 

Break

10.30 -11.00

Morning Session

11.00 – 12. 30

 

Topic: Whose Justice?

 

Format: lecture (including screening of inserts of film) and discussion

 

Objective: The session presents step further in examining how peace building through human rights approach is built by state institutions with support of international community. Aim of the session is to demonstrate how institutional justice is masculinized, often militarized, subordinating women experience of war to that of men, or making women fully invisible. Using two cases of reparations: so called material (war related pensions) and symbolic (memorials) reparations, it will be shown how both are used to in former Yugoslavia to reinforce gender inequality, nationalist politics and identities, or differences in general. Finally, the session will outline how civil society initiatives address this issue.

 

 

 

Assignments

Bougarel, Xavier. Death and the Nationalist: Martyrdom, War Memory and Veteran Identity among Bosnian Muslims The new Bosnian mosaic : identities, memories and moral claims in a post-war society / edited by Xavier Bougarel, Elissa Helms, Ger Duijzings.

Moll, Nicolas. (2013). Fragmented memories in a fragmented country: memory competition and political identity-building in today's Bosnia and Herzegovina, Nationalities Papers: The Journal of Nationalism and Ethnicity, 41:6, 910-935

 

Lunch

Time: 12.30-13.30

Afternoon Session

13.30-15.00

 

Topic: Encountering 'the Other'

 

Format: students’ presentation of cases(3 students present three articles (see bellow)), discussion and short lecture

 

Objective: The aim of the session is to show how meeting the ‘other’ usually is not happening through some new patterns of behavior producing potential new relationships (something emancipatory), but through continuities of rather patriarchal patterns of social life.

 

Assignments

Core texts/cases for discussion (participants read only one of the following three articles):

Helms E. 2010. 'The gender of coffee: women and reconciliation initiatives in post-war Bosnia and Herzegovina' Focaal: 57, 17-32.

Jansen S. 2010. 'Of wolves and men: postwar reconciliation and the gender of inter-national encounters' Focaal: Journal of Global and Historical Anthropology 57, 33-49.

Hromadžić A. 2011. 'Bathroom mixing: youth negotiate democracy in postconflict Bosnia and Herzegovina' Political and Legal Anthropology Review 34:2, 268-289.

 

 

DAY SIX

DAY SEVEN

WEEKEND July, 08-09

 

Excursions (to be chosen by the participants)

 

DAY EIGHT

date: 10 July

Morning Session

time: 9.00 – 10.30

 

topic(s): Beyond War Consequences

 

instructor(s) Nejra Nuna Čengić, PhD

 

format:exercise, lecture (including screening of inserts of film) and discussion

 

Objective: Consequences of war never exist in vacuum, but intersect with many other processes of society reconstruction and global transformations. In other words, post-war reconstruction is often associated with other transformations, in case of former Yugoslav states, post socialist (socio-economic) transformations. This often produces difficult consequences for population. In this process, vulnerable groups – both new, but also old groups exposed to long-term discrimination that is usually invisible or ‘natural’ (structural violence) - are particularly affected. Finally, the session will demonstrate how initiatives for social justice can move ethno-nationalistic political agenda and unify people across ethnic boundaries

 

 

assignments: Core texts:

Jansen S. 2007. 'Troubled locations: return, the life course and transformations of "home" in Bosnia-Herzegovina' Focaal 49, 15-30.

 

Break

10.30 -11.00

Morning Session

11.00 – 12. 30

 

Topic: Women and Political Representation

 

Format: lecture and discussion

 

Objective: Why is so difficult to have political representation of women? Why politics is not attractive to women? How 'politics' is valued and understood in general in a post-conflict society? Why always that dilema between voting for a woman and voting for the candidate we support? Why is so difficult for women to move away from men agenda and their way of behaviour in formal politics? Among others, the session will address these questions using case of post-war Bosnia and Herzegovina.

 

 

assignments: Core text: Helms E. 2007. '"Politics is a whore": women, morality and victimhood in post-war Bosnia-Herzegovina' In: Bougarel X., Helms E. & Duijzings G. (eds) The new Bosnian mosaic: memories, identities and moral claims in a post-war society. Aldershot: Ashgate. 235-254.

 

Lunch

Time: 12.30-13.30

Afternoon session

13.30-15.00

 

Topic: Ambivalent Civil Society

 

Format: short lecture and discussion

 

Objective: The final session will be a kind of course revision, particularly from the aspect of civil society’s role in peacebuilding and its potential for change. Although its role has already being demonstrated throughout the whole course through specific initiatives addressing shortcomings of peacebuidling process, its role – both potentials and shortcomings – will be specifically addressed during this session. We will see how it is about the realm where most changes happen: from political action (care for public good) through substitute for missing social services to source of livelihood.

 

Assignments

 

DAY NINE

date: 11 July instructor(s) Nikolai Vukov, PhD

Morning Session

time: 9.00 – 10.30

 

instructor(s): Nikolai Vukov, PhD

 

topic(s): Traumatic Pasts, Social Fragmentation and the Future: Memory to Societal Divisions and Reconciliation. Introduction to the main themes covered by the course

 

format:interactive lecture

 

Objective:

 

 

assignments:

Break

10.30 -11.00

Morning Session

11.00 – 12. 30

 

Topic: Religious Identities and Societal Divisions. Remembering the ‘Revival Process’ in Bulgaria

 

Format: Presentation

 

Objective:

 

 

assignments:

Text: Vukov, N., Resettlements, Memory and Commemorative Returns: the Noting of the “Revival” Process in Bulgaria and the Politics of Memory. In: Migration, Memory, Heritage: Socio-Cultural Approaches to the Bulgarian-Turkish Border. Sofia, IEFSEM – BAS: 12–28. – http://www.2sidesborder.org/migration%20EN/index.html#/1/

 

 

Lunch

Time: 12.30-13.30

Afternoon session

13.30-15.00

 

Topic: Studying divided societies and reconciliation from the perspectives of memory studies

 

Format: discussion

Questions:

How does memory of traumatic events in the past trigger and maintain societal divisions and how these divisions are reflected in memory practices and commemorations?

What implications have societal divisions got on collective memory and its political, social, and cultural representation?

How is memory of societal divisions in the past maintained and reproduced over time?

 

 

Objective:

 

Assignments

Suggested Reading

Bergholz, M., Violence as a Generative Force: Identity, Nationalism, and Memory in Balkan Community (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2016).

Herf, J., Divided Memory: The Nazi Past in the Two Germanys (Harvard University Press, 1997).

Richards, M., “Francoism, Social Change and Memories of the Spanish Civil War” – History and Memory, vol. 4, Fall 2002.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DAY TEN

date: 12 July

Morning Session

time: 9.00 – 10.30

 

topic(s): Post-socialist Societies: Divisions, Fragmentations and Reconciliation

 

 

instructor(s) Nikolai Vukov, PhD

 

format:exercise, interactive lecture

 

Objective:

 

assignments:

Break

10.30 -11.00

Morning Session

11.00 – 12. 30

 

Topic: Societal Divisions and Gender Transformations: Notes on the Post-Communist Transition Processes in Eastern Europe

 

Format: Presentation

 

Objective:

 

assignments:

Lunch

Time: 12.30-13.30

Afternoon session

13.30-15.00

 

Topic: Societal Divisions and Gender Transformations: Notes on the Post-Communist Transition Processes in Eastern Europe(with references to the film “The Lives of Others”)

 

 

Format: discussion

Questions:

How are social divisions affected by the post-communist transition in Eastern Europe?

What are the gender dimensions of post-communist transformations and how they contribute to societal divisions and reconciliation?

How ‘collective’ is collective memory about traumatic pasts and what are the means of reconciling societal divisions within the individuals’ private worlds?

 

 

Objective:

 

Assignments

Suggested readings:

Kopecek, M., ed., Past in the Making: Historical Revisionism in Central Europe after 1989 (Budapest and New York: Central European University Press, 2007).

Verdery, K., The Political Lives of Dead Bodies. Reburial and Post-socialist Change (New York: Columbia University Press, 1999).

 

 

DAY ELEVEN

date:13 July

Morning Session

time: 9.00 – 10.30

 

topic(s): Conflict and division

 

instructor(s) Almut Rochowanski, Peacebuilding UK

 

format: Interactive lecture

 

Objective:

 

assignments:

To discuss three case studies of different forms of division and how it has been created or exacerbated by conflict. Who created these divisions and why and how? How do notions of gender enter into these divisions?

Break

10.30 -11.00

Morning Session

11.00 – 12. 30

 

Topic: Women’s role in peacebuilding.

 

 

Format: Presentation of key studies and research on the above.

 

 

Assignments: the story of Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom in 1915. Video.

How WWI split women’s movements all over the world?

Lunch

Time: 12.30-13.30

Afternoon Session

13.30-15.00

 

Topic: Regressive gender roles during armed conflict and their effect on women’s mobilizing

 

Format: interactive lecture

 

assignments:

 

DAY TWELVE

date:14 July

Morning Session

time: 9.00 – 10.30

 

topic(s): Conclusions/”learnings” for activism and for women mobilizing for peace.

 

instructor(s) Almut Rochowanski, Peacebuilding UK

 

format: interactive lecture

 

Objective:

 

 

Break

10.30 -11.00

Morning Session

11.00 – 12. 30 Lecturer: Prof. Paolo Minuto, Italian Cinema History, University for Foreigners Reggio Calabria, Italy

 

Topic: National reconciliation in post-war Italy: The Industry: Cinecittà and the studios

 

 

 

Format: Lecture and clips screening

 

Objective: to show how the economy of the entertainment was affected by the war and as it was restored and transformed after the war

 

Assignments: discussions about the importance of the economy of the entertainment in the wars and in the post wars contexts

Lunch

Time: 12.30-13.30

Afternoon Session

13.30-15.00

 

Topic: National reconciliation in post-war Italy: The Neorealism peiod I

 

Format: Lecture and clips screening

 

Objective: How the social issues and the Myth of the Liberation in the Cinema could rebuild a national union and a national identification

 

Assignments: Discussion about the modern Myth created by media and cinema in particular con help to build a new national unification and a new national identity.

 

 

 

 

DAY THIRTEEN

DAY FORTEEN

WEEKEND July, 15-16

 

Excursions (to be chosen by the participants)

 

DAY FIFTEEN

date:17 July

Morning Session

time: 9.00 – 10.30

 

Tutor: Prof. Paolo Minuto

 

Topic National reconciliation in post-war Italy: The Neorealism peiod II

 

Format: Lecture and clips screening

 

Assignments: Discussion on how and wether the new national identity can be rebuild by the cinema and how and wether it could reach the popular and almost illiterate sectors of the population.

 

Objective: How the popular cinema can be useful for the national post war reconciliation and the Italian national language problem as part of the reconciliation and unification problem

Break

10.30 -11.00

Morning Session

11.00 – 12. 30

 

topic(s): National reconciliation in post-war Italy: The Comedy Italian Style in the Neorealism period

 

instructor(s) Prof. Paolo Minuto, Italian Cinema History, University for Foreigners Reggio Calabria, Italy

 

format: Lecture and clips screening

 

Objective: How the popular cinema can be useful for the national post war reconciliation and the Italian national language problem as part of the reconciliation and unification problem

 

assignments: Discussion on how the popular narrative in cinema and how a national language can serve as reconciliation engine for the new entire nation

Lunch

12.30-13.30

Afternoon Session

13.30-15.00

 

Topic: National reconciliation in post-war Italy: The Sixties: The new Italian Cinema and the war memory

 

Format Lecture and clips screening

 

Objective: How the Italian Cinema reflected the effects of the post war reconciliation in Italy after fifteen years from the end of the War

 

 

 

DAY SIXTEEN

Date: July 18

Morning Session

Time: 9.00 – 10.30

 

Topic(s): Introduction into Women, Gender, Religion, Violence and Conflict Resolution

 

Instructor(s) Prof. Dr. Ulrike E. Auga

 

Format: Lecture and Discussion

 

Objective: Key Concepts in Womens’ and Gender Studies, Key concepts of the category Religion, Introduction methodology for the decolonization of knowledge production, concepts of conflict resolution and solidarity

 

Assignments:

Reading: Auga, Ulrike, von Braun, Christina, “Beyond Boundaries: Introduction”, in: Ulrike Auga, Christina von Braun (Eds.), Gender in Conflicts. Palestine- Israel- Germany, Berlin, et al.: LIT Verlag, 2006, 1-14.

 

Break

10.30 -11.00

Morning Session

11.00 – 12. 30

 

Topic: Gender, Religion, Violence and Conflict Resolution in the Israel/Palestine Confrontations 1

 

Format: Discussion of Text 1

 

Objective: Intersectionality of categories of Gender, Nation, Religion, Race; Interdependence of epistemic, economic violence and sovereign violence; Violence and Conflict Resolution; Islam and Gender

Lunch

Time: 12.30-13.30

Afternoon Session

13.30-15.00

 

Topic: Gender, Religion, Violence and Conflict Resolution in the Israel/Palestine Confrontations 2

 

Format: Discussion of Text 2

 

Assignments:

Reading: Auga, Ulrike, “Undoing Gender: Nationalisms, Emerging Communities and Gender in View of Globalization. Also a Gender Based Reading of the Palestinian Declaration of Independence and the Charter of the Islamic Resistance Movement (Hamas)“, in: Ulrike Auga, Christina von Braun (Eds.), Gender in Conflicts. Palestine- Israel- Germany, Berlin, et al.: LIT Verlag, 2006, 37-59.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DAY SEVENTEEN

Date: July 19

Morning Session

Time: 9.00 – 10.30

 

Topic(s): Gender, Religion, Violence and Conflict Resolution in the Transition of Eastern European Countries

 

instructor(s) Prof. Dr. Ulrike E. Auga

 

Format: Introduction Lecture and Discussion

 

Objective: Historic, cultural and theoretical knowledge on the assigned area; discursivity of power, knowledge and truth production; the concept of the radical social imaginary

 

Assignments:

Reading: Auga, Ulrike, “Resistance and the Radical Social Imaginary: A Genealogy from “Eastern European” Dissidence to New Social Movements: Connecting the Debates between Activism and Postcolonial, Post-secular and Queer Epistemology”, in: Ulrike Auga et al. (Eds.), Resistance and Visions - Postcolonial, Post-secular and Queer Contributions. Journal of the ESWTR, 22 (2014) 5-30.

Break

10.30 -11.00

Morning Session

11.00 – 12.30

 

Topic: Gender, Religion, Violence and Conflict Resolution in the Transition of Eastern European Countries: Example The Peaceful Revolution in East Germany – Gains and Losses

 

Format: discussion of Text 3

 

Objective: the ambiguous role of Christian churches as dominant and resistant agents; the secularism, postsecularism; return of religions, as violent and emancipatory Agent; Agency, Religion and Gender; Concepts of Subject formation, agency and human flourishing; resistance and vision

Lunch

Time: 12.30-13.30

Afternoon Session

13.30-15.00

 

Topic: Gender, Religion, Violence and Conflict Resolution in the transition of Eastern European Countries: the Example Russia –Neonationalism and constructions of Religion and Gender and Resistance

 

Format: Watch extract from resistant performance; Discussion Interdependence Nationalism and Fundamentalism and Gender Construction, Violence and Resistance, the importance of resistant and visionary new social movements

 

Assignments

 

 

 

 

 

DAY EIGHTEEN

Date: July 20

Morning Session

Time: 9.00 – 10.30

 

Topic(s): Gender, Violence and Conflict Resolution in the South African Transition and its Negotiated Revolution 1

 

Instructor(s) Prof. Dr. Ulrike E. Auga

 

Format: Introduction Lecture and Discussion

 

Objective: the ambiguous role of Religion as dominant and resistant agent, nation-building, nationalism, gender and Religion; Nation State + market economy = democracy?

 

Assignments:

Reading: Auga, Ulrike, “Truth and Reconciliation or Masculine Redemption at the Cape of Good Hope? Religious Legitimation of National Gender Construction”, in: Julius Heinicke, Hilmar Heister, Tobias Robert Klein (Eds.) Kuvaka Ukama – Building Bridges. Festschrift für Flora Veit-Wild, Bettina Weiss Verlag, Kalliope: Heidelberg 2012. 257-273.

Break

10.30 -11.00

Morning Session

11.00 – 12. 30

 

Topic: Gender, Violence and Conflict Resolution in the South African Transition and its Negotiated Revolution 2

 

Format: Discussion of Text 4

 

Objective: The ambiguity of Truth and Reconciliation Commissions; The problem of rights discourses for women and gender constructions; Differentiate between hegemonic masculinities and oppressed masculinities and Religion.

Lunch

Time: 12.30-13.30

Afternoon session

13.30-15.00

 

Topic: Conclusion, Summary, Outlook

 

Format: Summarize three days, Repeat and deepen concepts, discuss remaining questions

 

Assignments

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DAY NINETEEN

date: July 21

Morning Session

time: 9.00 – 10.30

 

topic(s): Round table “The role of Civil Initiatives in Reconcilliation of the Divided Societies”

 

instructor(s)

 

Objective:

 

assignments:

 

Break

10.30 -11.00

Morning Session

11.00 – 12. 30

 

Topic: Round table (continuation)

 

 

Assignments:

 

Lunch

Time: 12.30-13.30

Afternoon Session

13.30-15.00

 

Closing ceremony

 

 

Social dinner

20:30-23.00

 

DAY TWENTY

DAY TWENTY ONE

WEEKEND July, 22-23

 

Excursions (to be chosen by the participants)

 

 

ARRIVAL DAY

12.07.2015

 

 

18.00-19.30 Registration and opening

 

20.00- social dinner

 

 

DAY ONE

date: 13.07.2015

Morning Session

time: 9.00 – 10.30

 

topic: Cultural memory, identity, sites of memory. Methodological framework.

 

instructor(s) Dr. Ilya Dementev

 

format: Lecture

 

Objective: during this session participants will be provided with the main concepts of the contemporary memory studies and other similar fields of the humanities

 

assignments: the students shall prepare questions to put to the instructor after the break

(last 15 minutes of the session)

Break

10.30 – 11.00

Morning Session

11.00 – 12.30

 

Topic: The World Wars in the cultural memory in the Soviet Union: trends and controversies

 

Format: Lecture

 

Objective: during this session participants will contact with the main topics concerning the Soviet cultural memory and the place of the World Wars’ history in this memory

 

assignments: the students shall prepare questions to put to the instructor after the break

(last 15 minutes of the session)

Lunch

Time: 12.30 – 13.30

Afternoon Session

13.30 – 15.00

 

Topic: How do we remember World Wars? The Soviet experience

 

Format: Free discussion of the topic explored in the first two sessions

 

Objective: during the session participants will have the opportunity to put questions and to debate with the instructor and with each other the topic presented in the first two sessions.

 

DAY TWO

date: 14.07.2015

Morning Session

time: 9.00 – 10.30

 

topic: The World Wars in the cultural memory in the post-Soviet Russia: discussing history politics

 

instructor(s) Dr. Ilya Dementev

 

format: Lecture

 

Objective: during this session participants will get the main problems in the Russian post-Soviet history politics and its impact on the cultural memory of Russians.

 

assignments: the students shall prepare questions to put to the instructor after the break

(last 15 minutes of the session)

Break

10.30 – 11.00

Morning Session

11.00 – 12.30

 

Topic: Memory wars, memory laws, politics of identity: it happens everywhere in the post-Soviet space

 

Format: Lecture, discussion

 

Objective: during the session participants will contact with some cases of the memory politics and politics of identity in the post-Soviet space

Lunch

Time: 12.30 – 13.30

Afternoon Session

13.30 – 15.00

 

Topic: “Hard questions” about the World Wars’ history

 

Format: Lecture, discussion

 

Objective: during this session participants will contact with the main “hard questions” such as violence and traumas, gender aspects in the war experience and in the Russian cultural memory

 

assignments: the students shall prepare questions to put to the instructor after the break

(last 15 minutes of the session)

 

 

DAY THREE

date: 15.07.2015

Morning Session

time: 9.00 – 10.30

 

topic: Commemorating World War II in Eastern Europe: Monumental Representations and Politics of Memory before and after 1989

 

 

instructor(s) Dr. Nikolai Vukov

 

 

format: Interactive lecture

 

assignments:

Break

10.30 – 11.00

Morning Session

11.00 – 12.30

 

Topic: Monuments of the Socialist Period in Bulgaria: Public Debates and Visual Transformations after 1989

 

Format: Discussion

 

Texts for discussion:

Vukov, N., “Brotherly Help” Representations or “Imperial” Legacy: Monuments to the Soviet Army in Bulgaria before and after 1989. – Ab Imperio, 1, 2006, pp. 267-292.

Vukov, N., Refigured Memories, Unchained Representations: Post-Socialist Monumental Discourse in Bulgaria. – In: Brunnbauer, U., Stefan Troebst (Hg.), Zwischen Nostalgie und Amnesie: Erinnerung an den Kommunismus in Suedosteuropa, Böhlau Verlag, Köln, 2006, pp. 71-86.

 

Lunch

Time: 12.30 – 13.30

Afternoon Session

13.30 – 15.00

 

Topic: Representations of Women and Gender Stereotypes in Socialist Monumental Art in Bulgaria

 

 

Format: Presentation and discussion

Questions:

How is WWII represented in monuments and public commemorations in Eastern Europe?

How did the political changes of 1989 influence the practices of memory and commemoration?

What new emphases in the memory of WWII appeared after the end of the communist period?

What gender conventions were applied in monumental representation of the communist period?

 

 

 

 

DAY FOUR

date: 16.07.2015

Morning Session

time: 9.00 – 10.30

 

topic: Forced Labour in Nazi-Occupied Europe: Survivors and Life Stories.

 

instructor(s) Dr.Ana Luleva

 

format: Interactive lecture

 

assignments:

Break

10.30 – 11.00

Morning Session

11.00 – 12.30

 

Topic: Memory politics and memory groups in Bulgaria after 1989

 

Format: Discussion

 

Texts:

Luleva, A. Politics of memory in post-socialist Bulgaria. – In: Ethnoscripts,Hamburg Universität, 2010, Jg. 12, 1, 77-93.

Adler, N. The returned of the repressed: survival after the Gulag. – In: On Living through Soviet Russia. Edited by Daniel Bertaux, Paul Thompson and Anna Rotkirch. Routledge, 2003, 212-233.

Ghodsee, K. The Left Side of History. Duke University Press. 2015; 101-126 (13 & 14 chapters).

Lunch

Time: 12.30 – 13.30

Afternoon Session

13.30 – 15.00

 

Topic: Transitional justice and memory about communist labour camps in post-socialist Bulgaria

 

Format: Presentation and discussion

Questions:

Is there an European Memory?

What are the main featuresof memory policies in Eastern Europe after 1989?

What is “Transitional Justice”?

Is there a connection between human rights and memory?

 

Text:

Luleva, A. Collective memory and policy of justice. Post-socialist discourses on memory politics and memory culture in Bulgaria- In: Ethnologia Balkanica, 2011, Vol. 15, 113-134.

 

DAY FIVE

date: 17.07.2015

 

Morning Session

time: 9.00 – 10.30

 

topic: Museum, Museum Effect, Museum Gaze, Museumification. History vs. Memory at the Museum. The Museumification of Communism in Central and Eastern Europe after 1989.

 

instructor(s) Dr. Svetla Kazalarska

 

format: Lecture

 

Objective:

 

Reading: Bennett, T. (1998). Pedagogic Objects, Clean Eyes, and Popular Instruction: On Sensory Regimes and Museum Didactics. In: Configurations, vol. 6, no. 3, 345–371.

Hutton, P. (2000). Recent Scholarship on Memory and History. In: The History Teacher, vol. 33, no. 4, 533–548.

Kansteiner, W. (2002). Finding Meaning in Memory: A Methodological Critique of Collective Memory Studies. In: History & Theory, no. 41, 179–197.

Break

10.30 – 11.00

Morning Session

11.00 – 12.30

 

Topic: Museumification Strategies: Normalization, Demonization and Disneyfication of Communism at the Museum. Case Studies and Discussion.

 

 

Format: Lecture, discussion

 

Reading: Rév, I. (2008). The Terror of the House. In: Ostow, R. (ed.) (Re)visualizing National History: Museums and National Identities in Europe in the New Millennium. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 47–89.

Vukov, N. (2006). Visualizations of the Past in Transition: Monuments and Museums in Hungary, Romania and Bulgaria after 1989. In: Kiossev, A. & Kabaktchieva, P. (eds.) Roles, Identities, and Hybrids (Working Papers). Sofia: Centre for Advanced Studies (http://www.cas.bg/uploads/files/Nikolai%20Vukov.pdf).

Berdahl, D. (2005). Expressions of Experience and Experiences of Expression: Museum Re-Presentations of GDR History. In: Anthropology & Humanism, vol. 30, no. 2, 156170.

 

Lunch

Time: 12.30 – 13.30

Afternoon Session

13.30 – 15.00

 

Topic: The Museumification of Communism in Bulgaria after 1989. The Museum “from Above” and the Museum “from Below”. Case Studies and Discussion.

 

 

Format: Lecture, discussion

 

 

 

Reading: Vukov, N. (2008). The “Unmemorable” and the “Unforgettable”: “Museumizing” the Socialist Past in Post-1989 Bulgaria. In: Sarkisova, O., Apor, P. (eds.). Past for the Eyes. East European Representations of Socialism in Cinema and Museums after 1989. Budapest, New York: CEU Press.

Guentcheva, R. (2012). Past Contested: The Museum of Socialist Art in Sofia. In: National Museums and the Negotiation of Difficult Pasts. Conference Proceedings from EuNaMus, Identity Politics, the Uses of the Past and the European Citizen, Brussels 26-27 January 2012. Dominique Poulot, José María Lanzarote Guiral & Felicity Bodenstein (eds.). EuNaMus Report No. 8 (http://www.ep.liu.se/ecp_home/index.en.aspx?issue=082).

 

 

DAY SIX

WEEKEND

date: 18.07.2015

9.30-18.00

Excursion to the Aladzha Monastery and the Stone Forest

 

DAY SEVEN

WEEKEND

date: 19.07.2015

9.30-18.00

Excursion to Nessebar

 

DAY EIGHT

date: 20.07.2015

Commemoration culture and Legacies of WW1 in Germany and Austria

Morning Session

time: 9.00 – 10.30

 

topic: How does our historical memory affect international relations in the present?

 

instructor(s) Dr. Ingrid Sharp

 

format: Interactive lecture

 

Objective: introduce the topic and identify research questions.

memory, commemoration and international relations

 

assignments:

Break

10.30 – 11.00

Morning Session

11.00 – 12.30

 

Topic: Reevaluating WW1 2014-18

- Legacies and commemoration of WW1 in Germany and Austria

- The continued problem of war commemoration in perpetrator nations

Reclaiming wartime suffering

 

Assignments: discussion of the film of Erich Maria Remarque (1929) All Quiet on the Western Front Film 1930, Lewis Milestone

 

Objective:

Lunch

Time: 12.30 – 13.30

Afternoon Session

13.30 – 15.00

 

Topic: Reclaiming German wartime heroism:

 

Format: introductory lecture and film discussion

 

Objective:

 

Reading and viewing: Film: The Red Baron (2008) Nikolai Műllerschön

Manfred von Richthofen: The Red Fighter Pilot (memoirs, 1917)

Jones, Heather, (2014) Goodbye to all that? Memory and meaning in the commemoration of the First World War Juncture Volume 20 issue 4 287-291.

Available at: http://www.ippr.org/juncture/memory-and-meaning-in-the-commemoration-of-the-first-world-war

Winter, Jay (2001) "The Generation of Memory: Reflections on the “Memory Boom” in Contemporary Historical Studies," Canadian Military History: Vol. 10: Iss. 3, Article 5.

Available at: http://scholars.wlu.ca/cmh/vol10/iss3/5 http://scholars.wlu.ca/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1329&context=cmh

 

DAY NINE

date: 21.07.2015

Commemoration culture and Legacies of WW2 in Germany and Austria

Morning Session

time: 9.00 – 10.30

 

topic: Memories of WW2 in Germany and Austria: Confronting a difficult past.

 

instructor(s) Dr. Ingrid Sharp

 

format: Lecture

 

Objective:

 

assignments:

Break

10.30 – 11.00

Morning Session

11.00 – 12.30

 

Topic: The Holocaust

Discussion topic: dealing with a traumatic past

 

Format: Lecture, discussion

 

Objective:

 

Reading: Stuart Taberner (Exhibition) Germany’s confrontation with the Holocaust in a Global context http://transnationalholocaustmemory.org/

 

Lunch

Time: 12.30 – 13.30

Afternoon Session

13.30 – 15.00

 

Topic: Holocaust memory and memorials in Germany and Austria today

 

Format: Discussion

Should Germany serve as a model for atoning for historical guilt?

 

Rachel Moore (2014) ‘Critical Memory Culture and the rise of the ‘Counter-monument’. The memorialisation of the Holocaust in Germany and Austria.’ Dissertation, University of Leeds

 

Reading: Assmann, Jan ‘Collective Memory and Cultural identity’ originally published in Jan Assmann and Tonio Hölscher eds 1988 Kultur und Gedächtnis 9-19 http://www.history.ucsb.edu/faculty/marcuse/classes/201/articles/95AssmannCollMemNGC.pdf

 

 

DAY TEN

date: 22.07.2015

Cultural memories of the traumatic past in Austria and Germany

Morning Session

time: 9.00 – 10.30

 

topic: Creating cultural memories

 

instructor(s) Dr. Ingrid Sharp

 

format: Lecture

 

Objective:

 

assignments:

Break

10.30 – 11.00

Morning Session

11.00 – 12.30

 

Topic: Historical truth and popular culture

What can be problematic about the combination of popular success with sensitive historical issues?

 

Format: Lecture, discussion

 

Objective:

Lunch

Time: 12.30 – 13.30

Afternoon Session

13.30 – 15.00

 

Topic: The suffering of the perpetrators

(How) can perpetrator suffering be represented in popular culture?

 

Format: Lecture, discussion

 

Case study (Film) Dresden (2006) Roland Suso Richter

How does Dresden establish its claim to historical accuracy?

What elements of history documentary are present in the film?

What elements of Hollywood production does Paul Cooke identify in the film?

Is this combination problematic?

To what extent does the film contribute to overcoming the traumatic past?

How do you understand the film’s ending?

 

Reading: Cooke, Paul (2008) 'Dresden (2006), TeamWorx and Titanic (1997): German Wartime Suffering as Hollywood Disaster Movie', in German Life and Letters, 61, 279-294, 2008.

Cohen-Pfister, Laurel (2005) ‘The Suffering of the Perpetrators: unleashing collective memory in German literature of the 21st century’ Forum of Modern Language Studies Vol 41 No 2 123-135

Wormald, Andrew (2011) ‘Between History and Melodrama: Authenticity in TeamWorx’s “Event Movies”on the National Socialist Past’ New Readings 11 pp. 49–65.

 


DAY ELEVEN

date:23 July

Morning Session

time: 9.00 – 10.30

 

Introduction: Wars from a gender aspect. Pacifist voices in WW1. International feminism, WILPF, initiatives in the Leage of Nations

 

instructor(s) Judit Acsády (HAS, Sociology, Budapest)

 

format: Lecture

 

Objective: The participants will be introduced to an understanding of gender aspect in social history. What are the different gendered war experiences? What was the reaction of organized women’s movements during WW1?( With power point illustrations).

Break

10.30 -11.00

Morning Session

11.00 – 12. 30

 

Topic: Changes of Gender roles during WW1. Peace treaties. Role of Women’s organizations in cultural de- and remobilization in Hungary. Examples of other countries.

 

Format: Lecture and free discussion of the topics

 

Objective: During the session the focus will be on the specialized subject of women’s movements and activities during and after WW1. How did the labour market change at the home front during the war and what were the challenges of gender relations after the war. What were the contribution of women’s organizations to the peace treaties? (With power point illustrations) Participants are welcome to share knowledge about women’s organizations in their country, and show power point illustrations.

Lunch

Time: 12.30-13.30

Afternoon Session

13.30-15.00

 

Topic: Representation of war in literature and arts. Representation of gender relations. Victims and survivors. Heroes, and the battered ones. Attitudes, strategies, changed morals.

 

Format: Seminar, discussion based on suggested readings

 

The student are required to bring an example of a novel or a piece of art about the war in their countries and present it shortly to the participants.

Suggested further readings:

Polcz Alain, One Woman on the Front. Central Europe University Press.

Bertha von Stuttner,  Die Waffen nieder! (Down with Arms!)

 

 

DAY TWELVE

date:24 July

Morning Session

time: 9.00 – 10.30

 

Topic(s): 1945 and after – experiences of WW1 through the communist lenses. What changed in the interpretations after 1990? 1948 – Changes of social order: the one party system. Policy of emancipation.

 

instructor(s) Judit Acsády (HAS, Sociology, Budapest).

 

format: Lecture and sicussion

 

Objective: This session will discuss what changed in the interpretations of war experiences after 1990? There will be information shared about the social changes after 1948 (the one party system, policy of emancipation) .

Overview of women’s role in armed conflicts and oppositional movements during state socialism (1956. 1968. Solidarnosc, Charta 77 etc)

 

Students are required to bring examples of their own countries and share knowledge about the themes.

 

Break

10.30 -11.00

Morning Session

11.00 – 12. 30

 

Topic: Discussion of the topics explored in the first session of the day

 

Format: Free discussion of the topic explored in the first part of the session

 

Objective: Discuss the different examples of women’s activities and also discussion of cultural representations of women in army and women with weapons recently in popular culture. Students are required to bring examples.

Lunch

Time: 12.30-13.30

Afternoon Session

13.30-16.30

 

Round-table “Europe and Russia in World Wars: Gender Aspects”

 

19.00- Closing ceremony and social dinner

 

DAY THIRTEEN

 

date: 25.07.2015

 

FREE DAY

Excursion to Balchik or Cape Kaliakra

 

DETAILED PLAN

 

Week One

 

DAY ONE

date: July

Morning Session

Morning: arrival of the participants, check -in

12.00 – 14.00 Registration, opening ceremony

Evening session

Time: 17.30-19.30 excursion to Porto

 

20.00- Social dinner

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DAY TWO

date: 8 July Women at war

instructor(s) Prof. Ingrid Sharp, University of Leeds

 

Morning Session

time: 9.30 – 11.00

topic: Interactive lecture to introduce the topic and identify research questions.

Break

11.00-11.30

Morning Session

time: 11.30-13.00

format: discussion

assignments: Text (Extracts): Olive Schreiner Women and Labour Chapter IV Women and War

Ruddick, Sara 1980 Maternal Thinking: Feminist Studies, Vol. 6, No. 2, (Summer, 1980), pp. 342-367

 

Lunch

13.00-14.00

Afternoon Session

Time: 14.00-15.30

topic: Women’s duty in wartime and their ‘responsibility’ for the war

format: lecture

assignments: Text: Ingrid Sharp (2007) ‘Blaming the Women: Women’s ‘Responsibility’ for the First World War’ . In: A.S. Fell and I.E. Sharp (eds.) The Women’s Movement in Wartime: International Perspectives, 1914-1919, Palgrave Macmillan, pp.86-109.



Questions:

What is the effect of war on gender roles?

Is there a correlation between gender, mothering or feminist consciousness and attitudes to war?

In what ways did organised women respond to the war?

How could a shared emphasis on gender difference based on maternalism lead to opposite reactions – fervent support for or wholehearted opposition to the war?

Did women’s organisations abandon feminist goals during the war or did they use their wartime service to further women’s advancement?

Was women’s emancipation furthered as a result of the war?

Suggested reading:

Grayzel, S. (1999) Women's Identities at War: Gender, Motherhood and Politics in Britain and France During the First World War. Chapel Hill, NC.

Higonnet et al (eds) (1987) Behind the Lines: Gender and the Two World Wars New Haven; London: Yale University Press.

Tylee, Claire (1990) The Great War and Women’s Consciousness Basingstoke Macmillan

 

 

DAY THREE

date: 9 July Men at war

Prof. Ingrid Sharp, University of Leeds

Morning Session

time: 9.30 – 11.00

topic: Men at War: ‘hegemonic masculinities’

format: interactive lecture:

assignments: text: Tosh, John (2004) ‘Hegemonic Masculinity and the History of Gender’ in Masculinities in Politics and War. Gendering Modern History

 

Break

11.00-11.30

Morning Session

time: 11.30-13.00

topic: Constructions of the soldier in the First World War

format: lecture

assignments: Joanna Bourke ‘The experience of killing’ in Bourne, J, Liddle, P and Whitehead, I (eds) The Great World War 1914-45 1. Lightning Strikes Twice London pp.293-309

 

Lunch

13.00-14.00

Afternoon Session

Time: 14.00-15.30

Format: Case study: Gender and war: alternative masculinities?

assignmentsQuestions:

What is the relationship between masculinity and war?

How is martial masculinity constructed and reinforced?

What alternative masculinities arise during wartime?

What motivates soldiers to fight?

How can wartime and post-war sexual violence against women be explained?

 

 

DAY FOUR

date: 10 July Representations of war

Prof. Ingrid Sharp, University of Leeds

Morning Session

time: 9.30 – 11.00

topic: Gendered representations of war to identify the ways in which gender is used in mobilizing the nation for war and in cultural demobilisation and cultural memory after the war

format: interactive lecture:

 

Break

11.00-11.30

Morning Session

time: 11.30-13.00

format: Discussion and group work

assignments:

Commemoration

Wartime Propaganda

Press and popular culture

Visual arts

Film

Text: Claudia Siebrecht 2011 ‘Imagining the Absent Dead: Rituals of Bereavement and the Place of the War Dead in German Women’s Art during the First World War’ German History Vol. 29 No 2 pp. 203-223

 

Lunch

13.00-14.00

Afternoon Session

Time: 14.00-15.30

Format: Case study: Käthe Kollwitz and Otto Dix

assignments: Text: Ingrid Sharp (2011) ‘Käthe Kollwitz’s Witness to War: Gender, Authority and Reception.’ Women in German Yearbook Vol 27 pp.87-107

Questions

How is war represented and for what purposes?

Who has the authority to speak about war?

Whose experience is commemorated?

How were women’s wartime experiences represented and remembered?

How were men’s wartime experiences represented and remembered?

What does the work of Otto Dix and Käthe Kollwitz tell us about the experience of war?

Suggested reading:

Dora Apel: "Heroes" and "Whores": The Politics of Gender in Weimar Antiwar Imagery The Art Bulletin, Vol. 79, No. 3. (Sep., 1997), pp. 366-384.

McGreevy, Linda. 2003 Bitter Witness: Otto Dix and the Great War. New York: Peter

Lang.

Jay Winter (1995) Sites of Memory, Sites of Mourning: The Great War in European Cultural History. Cambridge.

Horne, J. (ed.) (2010) A Companion to World War I. Oxford.

 

 

DAY FIVE

date: 11 July The Great War and Its Legacies

instructor(s) Nikolai Vukov

Associate Professor, Ph.D.

Institute of Ethnology and Folklore Studies with Ethnographic Museum –

Bulgarian Academy of Sciences



 

Morning Session

time: 9.30 – 11.00

topic: Introductory presentation on the main themes and issues covered by the course; general overview on the legacy of the Great War and on the national and gender policies in public commemorations

 

Break

11.00-11.30

Morning Session

time: 11.30-13.00

format: discussion

assignments: Text: Gillis, J. R., “Memory and Identity: the History of a Relationship”. – In: Gillis, J. R., ed. Commemorations: The Politics of National Identity. Princeton, New Jersey: Princeton University Press, 1994, 3-24.

 

Lunch

13.00-14.00

Afternoon Session

Time: 14.00-15.30

topic: Interactive lecture on mourning and memory after the Great War

format: lecture

assignments: Text (extract): Winter, J. M., Sites of Memory, Sites of Mourning: The Great War in European Cultural HistoryCambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1995.

Questions:

What are the major legacies of the Great War?

How did the war influence the practices of memory and commemoration?

What new forms in maintaining the memory of the dead evolve after the Great War?

What are the grounds for viewing the Great War as enabling the development of “modern memory”?

Suggested readings:

Mosse, G., Fallen Soldiers: Reshaping the Memory of the World Wars. New York: Oxford University Press, 1990.

Sherman, D., The Construction of Memory in Interwar France. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1999.

Winter, J. M., E. Sivan (eds.), War and Remembrance in the Twentieth Century. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999.

 

 

DAY SIX

WEEKEND

date: 12 July

 

Excursion to Lisbon

 

DAY SEVEN

WEEKEND

date: 13 July

 

Excursion to Santiago de Compostela



WEEK TWO

 

DAY EIGHT

date: 14 July Memory, Monuments and Public Rituals after the Great War

instructor(s) Nikolai Vukov

Associate Professor, Ph.D.

Institute of Ethnology and Folklore Studies with Ethnographic Museum –

Bulgarian Academy of Sciences



 

Morning Session

time: 9.30 – 11.00

topic: the Unknown Soldier and the Silence of Commemoration

format: Interactive lecture:

 

Break

11.00-11.30

Morning Session

time: 11.30-13.00

format: discussion

assignments: Texts: Inglis, K. S., “Entombing Unknown Soldiers: From London and Paris to Baghdad” – History and Memory, vol. 5,  2, Fall/ Winter 1993, 7-31.

Gregory, A., The Silence of Memory: Armistice Day, 1919-1946 (The Legacy of the Great War)Oxford: Berg, 1994.

 

Lunch

13.00-14.00

Afternoon Session

Time: 14.00-15.30

topic: Monuments and Memory in Interwar Europe

format: Presentation and discussion:

assignments:

Text: Prost, A., “Monuments to the Dead,” In: Nora, P., L. Kritzman, (eds.), Realms of Memory: The Construction of the French PastColumbia University Press, New York, 1997, 307-330.

Questions:

How was grief coped with after the war through commemorative practices?

What was the role of the different mourning communities (veterans, widows, orphans, etc.) in post-war commemorations?

How did the memory of the dead influence the identity of the living?

What was the role of public commemorations to the Great war in shaping public rituals during the 20th century?

Suggested readings:

Gillis, J. R., ed., Commemorations: The Politics of National Identity. Princeton, New Jersey: Princeton University Press, 1994.

Koselleck, R., “War Memorials: Identity Formations of the Survivors,” In: Practice of Conceptual ; History. Stanford : Stanford University Press, 2002, 285-326.

Mosse, G., “National Cemeteries and National Revival: The Cult of the Fallen Soldiers in Germany,” Journal of Contemporary History 14 (1979).

Sherman, D., “Monuments, Mourning and Masculinity in France after World War I,” Gender and History 8 (1), 1996, 82–107;

 

 

DAY NINE

date: 15 July National and Gender Identities after the Great War

instructor(s) Nikolai Vukov

Associate Professor, Ph.D.

Institute of Ethnology and Folklore Studies with Ethnographic Museum –

Bulgarian Academy of Sciences



 

Morning Session

time: 9.30 – 11.00

topic: National and Gendered Transcripts of War Memory

format: Interactive lecture:

 

Break

11.00-11.30

Morning Session

time: 11.30-13.00

format: discussion

assignments: Text: Bucur, M., “Edifices of the Past: War Memorials and Heroes in Twentieth Century Romania”. In: Todorova, M., ed., Balkan Identities: Nation and Memory. London: Hurst, 2004, 158-179.

 

Lunch

13.00-14.00

Afternoon Session

Time: 14.00-15.30

topic: The Legacy of the Great War

format: Round-table discussion

assignments:

The discussion will approach the following topics: Cultural demobilization and remobilization; Post-war violence and reconciliation; Memorial landscapes and cultural practices of remembrance; Anniversaries and the ‘everlasting’ memory of the Great War

Questions

How were national and gender identities influenced by the war?

What were the contestations between different groups on the legacies of the war?

What was the role of women in public commemorations?

How were post-war commemorations paralleled with violence of the post-war years?

Suggested readings:

Kantorowicz, E., The King’s Two Bodies: A Study in Medieval Political Theology (Princeton, New Jersey: Princeton University Press, 1997).

Mosse, G., “Two World Wars and the Myth of the War Experience,” Journal of Contemporary History 21 (1986).

Sharp, I., M, Stibbe, eds., Aftermaths of War: Women’s Movements and Female Activists, 1918–1923Brill, Leiden, 2011.

 

 

DAY TEN

date: July 16, 2014

instructor: Nona Shakhnazaryan

CISR, research fellow

 

Morning Session

time: 9.30 – 11.00

 

topic: Between History and Memory: Network, Minorities and Rescue (A Case Study of the Ottoman Empire during World War I)

 

instructor(s) Nona Shahnazarian

 

format: Lecture

 

Objective: this session will touch upon the collapse of the

Ottoman Empire at the onset of the 20th century provided by a hundred years of genocide and ethnic cleansing in southeastern Europe and Anatolia.

 

assignments: the students shall find some other historical parallels and prepare questions to put to the instructor after the break

(last 15 minutes of the session)

Break

11.00 -11.30

Morning Session

11.30 – 13. 00

 

Topic: Feedback on the alternative definitions of genocide, war crime, ethnic cleansing in particular and other lecture’s topic like individual memory and social trauma

 

Format: Free discussion of the topics explored in the lecture

 

Objective: During the session participants will have the opportunity to go deeper into theoretical framework of global historical issues that disturb people and countries in modern time. Participants are invited to put questions and to debate with the instructor and with each other the paradoxes and contradictions of the topic.

Lunch

Time: 13.00-14.00

Afternoon Session

14.00-15.30

 

Topic: War, gender, patriarchy in comparative perspective

 

Format: Lecture

 

Objective: during this session participants will contact with the main topics of the aggravation of patriarchal values during the modern era wars even though the shift of gender roles is there.

 

DAY ELEVEN

date:17 July, 2014

instructor(s) Prof. Francisco Reimão Queiroga, Fernando Pessoa University

Morning Session

time: 9.00 – 10.30

 

topic: The Portuguese participation in the First World War. Historical and social framework.

 

format: Lecture

 

Objective: during this session participants will contact with the main topics of the historical circumstances in which Portugal became involved in the First World War.

 

assignments: the students shall prepare questions to put to the instructor after the break

(last 15 minutes of the session)

Break

10.30 -11.00

Morning Session

11.00 – 12. 30

 

Topic: Feedback on the lecture’s topic

 

Format: Free discussion of the topic explored in the first session

 

Objective: During the session participants will have the opportunity to put questions and to debate with the instructor and with each other the topic presented in the first part of the session.

Lunch

Time: 12.30-13.30

Afternoon Session

13.30-15.00

 

Topic: The social impact of war: man who depart, women who wait.

 

Format: Lecture

 

Objective: during this session participants will contact with the main topics of the Portuguese social structure and gender roles within labour classes at the first few decades of the XXth century.

 

DAY TWELVE

date:18 July, 2014

instructor: Fatima Mariano – Researcher of the Institute of Contemporary History of Faculty of Social Sciences and Humanities – Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Portugal

 

Morning Session

time: 9.30 – 11.00

 

Topic: The Portuguese female organizations that supported the victims of war

 

instructor(s) Fátima Mariano

 

format: Lecture

 

Objective: During this session participants will know how Portuguese women have mobilized do help not only the soldiers who went to war, but also their families.

 

Assignments: the students shall prepare questions to put to the instructor after the break

(last 15 minutes of the session)

Break

11.00 -11.30

Morning Session

11.30 – 13. 00

 

Topic: Feedback on the lecture’s topic

 

Format: Free discussion of the topic explored in the first session

 

Objective: During the session participants will have the opportunity to put questions and to debate with the instructor and with each other the topic presented in the first part of the session.

Lunch

Time: 13.00-14.00

Afternoon Session

14.00-15.30

 

Topic: War nurses: The first Portuguese women to incorporate the Army

 

Format: Lecture

 

Objective: During this session participants will contact with the main topics related to the training of the first Portuguese nurses who were sent to war front and how they became the first Portuguese women to incorporate the Army

 

DAY THIRTEEN

date: 19 July

instructor(s) Prof. Olga Shnyrova, Ivanovo State University, Ivanovo Center for Gender Studies

 

Morning Session

time: 9.30 – 11.00

topic: Feminism, suffrage and war in Russia

Break

11.00-11.30

Morning Session

time: 11.30-13.00

topic: Presentations of participants according to their research interests

Lunch

13.00-14.00

Afternoon Session

Time: 14.00-15.30

topic: Presentations of participants

 

Social Dinner

20.00-

 

DAY FOURTEEN

date: 20 July

 

Morning Session

time: 9.30 – 12.00

Final round table Commemoration of war in Europe: comparative analysis. Discussion of the concept of the collective monograph.

 

Break

12.00-12.30

Morning Session

time: 12.30-13.30

Closing ceremony